Record numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress

September 18, 2020 0 By HearthstoneYarns

A record number of women have won major party nominations for governorships and seats in the House of Representatives this year — a full month before primary season is officially over.

Democrats on Tuesday chose former Michigan House Minority Leader Gretchen Whitmer (D) and Kansas state Sen. Laura Kelly (D) as their nominees for governorships.

ADVERTISEMENT

That brings the number of women who have won major party gubernatorial nominations to 11 — one more than the previous record, set five times over the last quarter century.

Democrats have nominated women as their gubernatorial candidates in Idaho, Texas, Georgia, New Mexico and Maine. Republicans nominated Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemSouth Dakota will not enforce social distancing at Mount Rushmore Fourth of July event South Dakota governor says she’s working with Trump officials on Mount Rushmore flyover South Dakota governor asks Trump to intervene in checkpoint dispute with Native American tribes MORE (R) in South Dakota. Incumbent Govs. Kate Brown (D) of Oregon, Kay Ivey (R) of Alabama and Kim Reynolds (R) of Iowa have all won renomination.

The number of female gubernatorial candidates is almost certain to swell in the month before primaries end. Women are close to the lead or leading races in Hawaii, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Florida and New Hampshire. Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) is all but certain to win renomination.

“We’re not just breaking records here this year, we’re blowing through them,” said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at the Eagleton Institute at Rutgers. “What we’re seeing this year is the whole reason why we want more women to run for office.”

Data from the Center for American Women and Politics show more women have won nominations for seats in Congress, as well.

When the polls closed in Michigan, Missouri and Washington state on Tuesday, a handful of women formally advanced to the November midterm elections, bringing the total number of female nominees above the previous record. Two years ago, 167 women secured major party nominations for seats in Congress.

Many candidates who won nominations on Tuesday are almost certain to return to Congress, including incumbents in safe districts like Reps. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann Dingell18 states fight conservative think tank effort to freeze fuel efficiency standards Pelosi: George Floyd death is ‘a crime’ OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Coal company sues EPA over power plant pollution regulation | Automakers fight effort to freeze fuel efficiency standards | EPA watchdog may probe agency’s response to California water issues MORE (D-Mich.), Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceFormer Surgeon General Vivek Murthy says public health threat of loneliness compounded by COVID-19; Trump says task force will ‘evolve’ Black Caucus moves to front and center in COVID fight House reverses, but Senate to return despite COVID threat MORE (D-Mich.), Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerTrump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy House passes massive T coronavirus relief package Bottom line MORE (R-Mo.) and Vicky HartzlerVicky Jo HartzlerOn The Money: Hopes fade for coronavirus relief deal this month | Burr problem grows for GOP | Layoffs hit record high of 11 million in March House poised to pass coronavirus relief bill: What you need to know today House Republican introduces bill to give meatpacking plants liability shield MORE (R-Mo.).

Four women who hold House seats from Washington state — Reps. Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneExpanding tax credit for businesses retaining workers gains bipartisan support House Democrats press Treasury on debit cards used for coronavirus relief payments Hillicon Valley: Trump threatens Michigan, Nevada over mail-in voting | Officials call for broadband expansion during pandemic | Democrats call for investigation into Uber-Grubhub deal MORE (D), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalBiden’s right, we need policing reform now – the House should quickly take up his call to action Defense bill turns into proxy battle over Floyd protests Top progressive lawmaker unveils bill requiring national police training standards MORE (D), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerHispanic Caucus endorses Washington Latina House candidate Cornell to launch new bipartisan publication led by former Rep. Steve Israel Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis MORE (R) and Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersBipartisan senators call for investigation of TikTok’s child privacy policies Hillicon Valley: Facebook permanently shifting thousands of jobs to remote work | Congressional action on driverless cars hits speed bump during pandemic | Republicans grill TikTok over data privacy concerns Top Commerce Republicans grill TikTok parent company MORE (R) — advanced to November’s midterm elections.

McMorris Rodgers faces a potentially strong challenge from Lisa Brown, a former state Senate Democratic leader. With thousands of ballots left to count, McMorris Rodgers had taken only about 500 votes more than Brown in the top-two primary, hinting at a close race ahead.

Herrera Beutler will also face a Democratic woman in November. The Republican narrowly led college professor Carolyn Long (D), 41 to 37 percent, with five other candidates splitting the remaining vote.

Democratic women won primaries on Tuesday and will face Reps. Tim WalbergTimothy (Tim) Lee WalbergThe health care crisis no one is talking about Overnight Defense: Pentagon policy chief resigns at Trump’s request | Trump wishes official ‘well in his future endeavors’ | Armed Services chair warns against Africa drawdown after trip GOP chairman after Africa trip: US military drawdown would have ‘real and lasting negative consequences’ MORE (R-Mich.), Mike Bishop (R-Mich.), Justin AmashJustin AmashOver 1,400 pro athletes, coaches call on Congress to back bill ending qualified immunity House Democrats set to introduce proposed ban on chemical weapons Mark Cuban says he’s decided not to run for president MORE (R-Mich.), Paul MitchellPaul MitchellGOP lawmakers say Steve King’s loss could help them in November Democrats on edge over California special election nail-biter Michigan GOP congressman sues governor over emergency orders MORE (R-Mich.), Blaine LuetkemeyerWilliam (Blaine) Blaine LuetkemeyerScalise blasts Democrats for calling on certain companies to return PPP loans Scalise targets China, WHO response from coronavirus oversight perch McCarthy unveils new GOP-led China task force MORE (R-Mo.), Jason SmithJason Thomas SmithPass the Primary Care Enhancement Act Trump coronavirus briefings put health officials in bind House GOP lawmakers urge Senate to confirm Vought MORE (R-Mo.) and Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseThe Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO GOP lawmaker introduces bipartisan guest worker bill Overnight Energy: Murkowski, Manchin unveil major energy bill | Lawmakers grill EPA chief over push to slash agency’s budget | GOP lawmaker accuses Trump officials of ‘playing politics’ over Yucca Mountain MORE (R-Wash.) in the fall. Democrats also nominated a woman, Haley Stevens, to run for a seat being vacated by Rep. Dave TrottDavid Alan TrottFormer GOP Michigan congressman says Trump is unfit for office Pro-Trump Republican immigrant to challenge Dem lawmaker who flipped Michigan seat Meet the lawmakers putting politics aside to save our climate MORE (R-Mich.).

And Democrats nominated women to replace former Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersFormer impeachment managers clash over surveillance bill VA could lead way for nation on lower drug pricing The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Dems release first transcripts from impeachment probe witnesses MORE Jr. (D-Mich.), who resigned in disgrace over sexual harassment accusations. Detroit voters picked City Council President Brenda Jones as the Democratic nominee to fill the remainder of Conyers’s term and former state Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D) to take over when the next Congress convenes.

Republicans picked insurance consultant Candius Stearns (R) as their nominee to replace retiring Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich.). Stearns will face Andy Levin, Sandy’s son, in the heavily Democratic district in November.

Women are running for office, and winning, more frequently now than ever before, Walsh said. The first year in which women captured more than 100 party nominations for U.S. House seats was 1992; every year since, women have won more than 100 nominations.

“If women aren’t in these races, we’re not going to see more women getting elected. It’s a process,” Walsh said.

The number of women nominated by major parties for House seats will expand in the month until primary season is over. Hawaii, Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont, Wisconsin, Alaska, Wyoming, Arizona, Florida, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Louisiana all have primary elections ahead.